Press Release

Release Date: June 14, 2018

by Chickasaw Nation Media Relations Office



  • Participants in the June 23 class at the Chickasaw Council House Museum, 209 N. Fisher, will craft corn husk dolls like these. The corn husk doll class is open to the public at no charge and materials will be provided.

TISHOMINGO, Okla. -- The Chickasaw Nation will host a corn husk doll class 1-3 p.m., Saturday, June 23, at the Council House Museum, 209 N. Fisher. The class is open to the public at no charge and supplies will be provided.

Susan Ledford, Education Specialist for the Chickasaw Nation, will teach the history and practice of creating corn husk dolls, which were used as play things for children.

Native Americans have crafted corn husk dolls for thousands of years, stretching back to the beginning of agriculture. They were prevalent when first contact with settlers occurred and are still produced today.

Corn husk dolls are often decorated and dressed. Hair, clothes and accessories such as bows and shawls can be made to adorn a doll, using materials like cloth, leather, twigs, sinew, yarn and horse hair.

The process and required materials are simple but allow for a great range of customization. For the June 23 class, participants will be submerging dried corn husks into warm water, and with a series of stacking, folding, rolling, tying and cutting movements, form a figure resembling a man or woman.

Seating is limited to 15 people and registration is necessary.

The Council House Museum houses a large collection of Chickasaw art, artifacts and archive materials. The museum gift shop offers a variety of souvenirs, books, music and Chickasaw language materials.

Hours of operations are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Friday, as well as 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday.

Individuals attending the class are invited to visit other nearby attractions like the Chickasaw National Capitol and Chickasaw Bank Museum.

For more information or to register, call 580-371-3351 or contact Susan.Ledford@Chickasaw.net.

Last Updated: 09/16/2016